TV Comedy Greats Take a Bow, Make them Laugh at Ceremony

Norman Milton Lear (born on 27 July 1922, Sanford and Son, One Day at the Time and The Jeffersons, Good Times and Maude, among others, is an american television writer and producer who created several sitcoms in the seventies. As a political activist he created in 1981 the group People for the American Way, protecting the rights of First Amendment and progressive causes. James Kimmel (born November 13, 1967)is a host, comedian, writer, and producer for American television. He’s Jimmy Kimmel Live’s host and executive producer! A late-night talk show debuted on ABC on January 26, 2003, at the Hollywood Masonic Temple in Hollywood, California, and on April 1, 2019, at the Zappos Theater in Las Vegas Strip, a secondary location.Kimmel hosted the 2012 and 2016 Primetime Emmy Awards as well as the 2017 and 2018 Academy Awards.The American star, writer and host of the game shows is Anderson (born August 15, 1970). He starred in his short-lived series, All About the Andersons, as well as in his fifth and final season with the ABC sitcom Black-ish and the Fox sitcom The Bernie Mac Show.He is known as NYPD Detective Kevin Bernard on Law & Order for his leading roles in drama series K-Ville, The Shield.

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. (AP) — “I don’t believe anything more than this, that laughter adds time to one’s life,” Norman Lear told an audience gathered to honor him and four other television comedy grandchildren.

 

“I think my mother loved me as much as I do,” added the writer-producer. “She said she had done that. But I wasn’t sure about it.”

Like the 97-year-old Lear, who made his name— and the history of television— with groundbreaking sitcoms including “All in the Family” and “The Jeffersons,” the other honorees at the Paley Center for Media ceremony on Thursday showed that creativity is ageless. Carl Reiner, 97; Bob Newhart, 90; Carol Burnett, 86; and Lily Tomlin, 80, with laughter and memories each won the room.

“Guess this is a heck of a time to tell you no, we’re not going to your Christmas party,” Newhart mocked Conan O’Brien after the late-night host introduced him as “one of my comedy heroes of all time.”

He pulls off the most robust sort of comedy — temporary, human, clean, and underground. And he makes everything look effortless, “said Newhart’s O’Brien.

 

With his debut album, the Grammy-winning “Bob Newhart’s Button-Down Brain,” the former accountant became an overnight sensation in 1960, scored sitcom hits with “The Bob Newhart Show” in the 1970s and “Newhart” in the 1980s, and won an Emmy as Proton on “The Big Bang Theory.”

The nostalgic moments included the introduction of Rob Reiner to his uncle, the writer-actor-producer whose TV career ranged from the variety series “Caesar’s Hour” in the 1950s to the production of “The Dick Van Dyke Show” to a recent role in “Angie Tribeca.”

“It’s the most beautiful thing to be able to do this for my father,” said the younger Reiner, who gave him an arm for help as they walked up to The Paley Honors hotel ballroom stage: a special salute to the Comedy Legends of Television.

 

Carl Reiner, who, with his childhood beginning in television credited a government-supported acting course, charmed the crowd by reciting lines from a Shakespeare soliloquy he learned as a kid and sharing an anecdote about another TV comedy force, Jack Benny. He named his biggest pride to his kids and grandchildren.

Carol Burnett was introduced by Kristin Chenoweth, who praised the singer-actress-comedian as one of the few who could do it and “with such a soul.”

As well as Television, Burnett, who appeared on Broadway, recalled what followed the arrival of “The Carol Burnett Show” in 1967.

“As a woman in this business, doing what the naysayers said couldn’t do wasn’t always convenient,” she said. Burnett said executives told her when she tried to exercise a contract clause with CBS for an hour-long variety show, “and I quote, ‘ It’s not for you gals. ‘”

 

She punctuated the tale with a sarcastic “huh.” On CBS, her long-running series received Emmy Awards armloads.

Tomlin, whose character parade made her a success on “Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In” and who stars in front of Jane Fonda on “Grace and Frankie,” was self-effacing, stating she could not suit Newhart’s “sterling one-liners.” Instead, she pleased the crowd by reciting several catchphrases of her characters, including Ernestine’s “one ring dingy” telephone operator.

“I’m so grateful for this great honor,” said Tomlin.

 

“Black-ish” actor Anthony Anderson embraced Lear, who said that Lear’s research pushed the community to deal with severe problems while shining the light on collective relations and late-night host Jimmy Kimmel that the author used humor to “encourage us to advance.”

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